Saturday, April 29, 2017

A Closer Look at the 2011 Architectural Report On Veblen House and Cottage

The fate of Veblen House now hangs in the balance, as the Friends of Herrontown Woods proposes to acquire and repair the buildings. The county has moved ahead with preliminary environmental studies, and has stated its intent to demolish the structures. One document it has used to rationalize demolition is "The Oswald and Elizabeth Veblen House and Cottage Conditions Assessment, prepared in 2011 by an architectural firm. A close look at the document reveals a number of basic errors, a negative bias, and a questionable approach to estimating costs.

The firm was paid $20,000 to develop a cost estimate for repairing the Veblen House and cottage. The report begins by reiterating research done in 2001 when the buildings were determined to be of national historic merit. There's a detailed history of ownership of the relevant parcels, along with some biographical information on Oswald Veblen's extraordinary career and the House's original owner, Jesse Paulmier Whiton-Stuart.

The county report then proceeds to detail the buildings' flaws. There is no positive language about such things as the high quality of construction or the custom craftsmanship inside the Veblen House. Though it offers some useful insights, the report makes some fundamental errors, misidentifying the materials used for interior walls and roof of the Veblen House. It estimates the cost of repairs by going room by room, rather than giving, for instance, one quote for painting the interior of the house.

The county has referred to the report, most recently in an April 25 document from the county administrator, and is using its cost estimates as a means of measuring the fitness of the Friends of Herrontown Woods for becoming the owner and caretaker of the buildings.

Members of FOHW, including a distinguished architect, have studied the county's architectural report and dug into its calculations. Along with the uniformly negative tone, the misidentification of basic elements like wall and roof material, and the room-by-room cost estimates, the report also boosts its cost estimate by adding a 50% "general conditions" and "concept design contingency". We also know that the cost of government projects tends to be higher, sometimes much higher, than when done by nongovernmental organizations.

To what extent, then, should we consider the Conditions Assessment to be the last word in determining actual cost of repairs? Below is a sampling of the report's cost estimates for repairing the Veblen House:

"Urgent Work"

$37,500 to replace wood shingle roof--Roof is not wood shingle. Most of it is metal, and is not leaking. The area covered by the roof is 1000 square feet.
$10,000 to install drainage system and waterproof foundation--Improved drainage around house should be done first, and may be sufficient
$5000 to install rat slab in basement--not necessarily advisable
$30,000 to mothball building with window covers and ventilation--FOHW would not mothball building but continue working
$36,500 in "general conditions" and "concept design contingency"--essentially, this assumes a 50% cost overrun.

"Necessary Work"

$36,800 to raise the house--Real problem is that gravel was piled next to the house, making the ground higher than original. Lowering ground to original level, and redirecting drainage away from house may be sufficient.
$71,000 to repair and paint exterior walls--seems high for replacing and painting some boards
$11,000 to repair exterior doors--also seems high for four doors
$26,500 to repair interior plaster walls and ceilings--Walls are not plaster. This does not include painting
$30,500 to repair windows and screens--Windows are very high quality. Some window sills and windowpanes need replacing. Other than that, they appear in good condition.
$10,000 to replace fixtures in bathrooms--Fixtures are from the period, in good condition, and don't need to be replaced. Two modern efficient toilets can be purchased for $400 total.
$26,500 to paint interior walls. Add to $26,500 for wall repairs, to equal $53,000 for interior walls.
$19,000 to refinish hardwood floors. For comparison, a ballpark figure offered for a 2000 square foot house by a local business was less than $10,000.
$183,000 for "general conditions" and "concept design contingency"--this is the 50% cost overrun added on to the already high estimates above.

The architectural study claims a total cost for "urgent" and "necessary" work of $600,000 for the Veblen House. Essentially, $220,000 of that is "general conditions" and "concept design contingency".

2 comments:

  1. I was Mrs Veblen's paperboy for a year, 1965-1966. I never received payment from her but I did not care. She never could find cash and instead tried to pay me with old magazines. I often sat with her in her living room and listened to her stories. At first I found her difficult to follow, to understand. Soon I looked at the pictures on the mantel. Although only 11 or 12 I easily recognized pictures of Woodrow Wilson with, as became evident, Mrs Veblen and her husband and others. She seemed to always have a fire going in the fireplace. The home had the aroma of a huntong lodge. I loved visiting with her when I made my bi-monthly visits to get paid. She was lonely and eager to have company. She was wonderful to talk to and I loved her voice and accent. I knew she must be a kind person. I hope the Veblen home is preserved. It is a remnant of an era long gone. Years later, after a career in the Marine Corps and federal law enforcement, I look back and wish I had more conversations with Mrs Veblen. J David Donahue, Quantico, VA, john.donahue@ncis.navy.mil

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    1. What a beautiful comment. Thank you! Details like this are so helpful for repopulating the house with images and feelings.

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